Goodbye shoes

 

I got a treadmill for my birthday in 2005.  We lived in Illinois and had three younger children and I wanted o be able to do my aerobic exercises at home.  Plus that year at my yearly physical after complaining of knee pain to my doctor she suggested that I lose some weight.  I was 145 pounds, 5’3″.

The next year at my annual physical I was 120 lbs.  She said I looked great and was in great shape.  She asked me what I had been doing.  I told her I had gotten a treadmill and started out walking but it quickly turned to jogging, then running and I was doing 30-50 miles per week plus lifting weights.  She told me I should stop running; that it was bad for my body.  She suggested  speed walking.  I tried it a few times but it didn’t feel the same as running. And whose kidding who, it looks ridiculous!  LOL

Fast forward a two years; I was running with a trainer once or twice a week and a group of women each weekend and when I could catch up with them during the week.  Alone I logged 4 days a week- with runs ranging from 6 to 14 miles at a shot.  I had never felt better emotionally or physically.

I joined a group to train for the Chicago Marathon.  The first year I chickened out after our first 20 mile run.  I decided to support the group by showing up along the route to cheer them on.  As I watched them finish, I realized I had logged 41 miles running around the city to catch them. I vowed to run the marathon the next year.

I trained over the winter and read every book I could find on training methodologies.  I ran inside most days, but ran outside a day or two even in the harshest winter weather.  Some Saturdays I would get home after 10 mile runs and collapse into a 2 hour nap, wake up, eat and then hit the gym for a few hours. I was on point and very focused.

I ran my first Marathon in 2009 and ran a 4:28.  I was disappointed.  I trained the same way for the next year and ran every 5 and 10K I could make and ran a 4:21 the next Chicago Marathon.  I ran 4 more marathons but never beat that time.

I tore my ACL skiing in 2011.   I recovered very quickly and continued to run. Then in 2015 I had a total hip replacement due to degenerative arthritis in my hip-joint.  The surgeon said he would see me next year for the other hip.  He told me I would never run again.  I went through a few months of major depression.  Not working out the way I had been because of healing and getting used to the new hip, when I went to the gym it was hard to watch other people do things I could not.  But I didn’t have pain anymore and I always reminded myself of that and kept going.   The hip surgery was the best choice.. and I was able to work through and while my workouts are different, in some ways I think they are better, and healthier.

Don’t tell my surgeon, but I started running a few months after hip surgery. It was a slow shuffle to start with lots of walking breaks. But it felt good!  I ran my first 5k since. Surgery yesterday. It won’t be the last, it reminded me of all the reasons I love to run; the activity, the people, the sense of community, and the competitive spirit!❤️🙏🏻

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I have 5 pairs of running shoes that I rotate through.  This blue/green pair of Mizunos I have had for 7 years.  I guesstimate they have 2000+ miles on them. They are a little torn and flat through the heel; but  wear them for light worki=outs and on the treadmill.  The lace broke last week.  I sat down and took stock and decided it was time to let them go.  I sat down yesterday and held them in my lap; recalling all the races and miles I had seen in these shoes.

I ran a 17K race in them – I had misjudged the length and blown out a 6:30 mile at 15 k then died.  I was struggling to breathe as a robust woman trotted past me the last 2K.  Live and learn.  I recalled a run that I had thought was a road race that was actually a trail run.  I washed the shoes by hand the next day to make sure they where ok.

Goodbye shoes.  I am so thankful you were in my life!

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